Senate passes Sosnowski bill changing how CRMC administrator is appointed

 

STATE HOUSE — The Senate today passed legislation introduced by Sen. V. Susan Sosnowski (D-Dist. 37, New Shoreham, South Kingstown) that would change the manner in which the administrator of the Coastal Resources Management Council is appointed.

Under the legislation (2021-S 2217), the governor, rather than the council, would appoint an executive director of the agency. The bill also adds the requirement that the gubernatorial appointment be subject to the advice and consent of the Senate. The executive director would coordinate with the director of the Department of Environmental Management. The bill also defines the purpose of the director to continue planning and management of coastal resources.

“This legislation would make the CRMC a cabinet-level agency led by a governor-appointed executive director,” said Senator Sosnowski. “This is a positive step needed to modernize, update and reform the agency to achieve more accountability and transparency for an agency that performs vitally important functions that are critical to the future of Rhode Island’s environment and economy.”

The Coastal Resources Management Council is primarily responsible for the preservation, protection, development and restoration of the coastal areas of the state through the implementation of its integrated and comprehensive coastal management plans and the issuance of permits for work with the coastal zone of the state.

The measure now moves to the House of Representatives for consideration.

 

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