Sen. Ciccone’s Dignity at Work Act that combats workplace bullying passes Senate

 

STATE HOUSE – The Senate today passed Sen. Frank A. Ciccone’s (D-Dist. 7, Providence, North Providence) legislation (2022-S 2486A) that would provide workers with more protection from bullying and harassment in the workplace.

“I have been introducing similar legislation for many years and in today’s climate of accountability being brought upon harassers, bullies, and abusers, we must continue the social progress we have made and pass this protective legislation for all employees in Rhode Island.  Rhode Island workers deserve to have the Dignity at Work Act become law and I thank my colleagues in the Senate for supporting this important piece of workplace protection legislation,” said Senator Ciccone.

The purpose of the legislation is to recognize and protect the right to dignity in the workplace, and to prevent, detect, remedy and eliminate all forms of workplace bullying and harassment that infringe upon that right.  It will provide legal remedies for workers who are targets of workplace bullying, moral, psychological or general harassment and/or other forms of workplace abuse in order to make whole such targets of workplace abuse.  The bill also provides an incentive for employers to prevent, detect, remedy and eliminate workplace bullying in order that such behaviors shall be addressed and eliminated before they cause harm to the targets of such behaviors.

The bill now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

 

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